A Companion to Modern British and Irish Drama 1880-2005 by Mary Luckhurst

By Mary Luckhurst

This wide-ranging Companion to trendy British and Irish Drama bargains hard analyses of a number of performs of their political contexts. It explores the cultural, social, monetary and institutional agendas that readers have to interact with with the intention to get pleasure from smooth theatre in all its complexity.

  • An authoritative advisor to fashionable British and Irish drama.
  • Engages with theoretical discourses difficult a canon that has privileged London in addition to white English men and realism.
  • Topics lined contain: nationwide, local and fringe theatres; post-colonial levels and multiculturalism; feminist and queer theatres; intercourse and consumerism; know-how and globalisation; representations of battle, terrorism, and trauma.

Content:
Chapter 1 family and Imperial Politics in Britain and eire: The Testimony of Irish Theatre (pages 7–21): Victor Merriman
Chapter 2 Reinventing England (pages 22–34): Declan Kiberd
Chapter three Ibsen within the English Theatre within the Fin De Siecle (pages 35–47): Katherine Newey
Chapter four New girl Drama (pages 48–60): Sally Ledger
Chapter five Shaw one of the Artists (pages 63–74): Jan McDonald
Chapter 6 Granville Barker and the court docket Dramatists (pages 75–86): Cary M. Mazer
Chapter 7 Gregory, Yeats and Ireland'S Abbey Theatre (pages 87–98): Mary Trotter
Chapter eight Suffrage Theatre: group Activism and Political dedication (pages 99–109): Susan Carlson
Chapter nine Unlocking Synge this day (pages 110–124): Christopher Murray
Chapter 10 Sean O'Casey's robust Fireworks (pages 125–137): Jean Chothia
Chapter eleven Auden and Eliot: Theatres of the Thirties (pages 138–150): Robin Grove
Chapter 12 Empire and sophistication within the Theatre of John Arden and Margaretta D'Arcy (pages 153–163): Mary Brewer
Chapter thirteen whilst was once the Golden Age? Narratives of Loss and Decline: John Osborne, Arnold Wesker and Rodney Ackland (pages 164–174): Stephen Lacey
Chapter 14 A advertisement luck: girls Playwrights within the Nineteen Fifties (pages 175–187): Susan Bennett
Chapter 15 domestic ideas from in another country: Mustapha Matura (pages 188–197): D. Keith Peacock
Chapter sixteen The continues to be of the British Empire: the performs of Winsome Pinnock (pages 198–209): Gabriele Griffin
Chapter 17 Wilde's Comedies (pages 213–224): Richard Allen Cave
Chapter 18 consistently performing: Noel Coward and the appearing Self (pages 225–236): Frances Gray
Chapter 19 Beckett'S Divine Comedy (pages 237–246): Katharine Worth
Chapter 20 shape and Ethics within the Comedies of Brendan Behan (pages 247–257): John Brannigan
Chapter 21 Joe Orton: Anger, Artifice and Absurdity (pages 258–268): David Higgins
Chapter 22 Alan Ayckbourn: Experiments in Comedy (pages 269–278): Alexander Leggatt
Chapter 23 'They either upload as much as Me': the good judgment of Tom Stoppard'S Dialogic Comedy (pages 279–288): Paul Delaney
Chapter 24 Stewart Parker's Comedy of Terrors (pages 289–298): Anthony Roche
Chapter 25 Awounded level: Drama and global struggle I (pages 301–315): Mary Luckhurst
Chapter 26 Staging ‘The Holocaust’ in England (pages 316–328): John Lennard
Chapter 27 Troubling views: Northern eire, the ‘Troubles’ and Drama (pages 329–340): Helen Lojek
Chapter 28 On struggle: Charles Wood's army sense of right and wrong (pages 341–357): sunrise Fowler and John Lennard
Chapter 29 Torture within the performs of Harold Pinter (pages 358–370): Mary Luckhurst
Chapter 30 Sarah Kane: from Terror to Trauma (pages 371–382): Steve Waters
Chapter 31 Theatre on the grounds that 1968 (pages 385–397): David Pattie
Chapter 32 Lesbian and homosexual Theatre: All Queer at the West finish entrance (pages 398–408): John Deeney
Chapter 33 Edward Bond: Maker of Myths (pages 409–418): Michael Patterson
Chapter 34 John Mcgrath and well known Political Theatre (pages 419–428): Maria DiCenzo
Chapter 35 David Hare and Political Playwriting: among the 3rd approach and the everlasting method (pages 429–440): John Deeney
Chapter 36 Left in entrance: David Edgar's Political Theatre (pages 441–453): John Bull
Chapter 37 Liz Lochhead: author and Re?Writer: tales, historic and smooth (pages 454–465): Jan McDonald
Chapter 38 ‘Spirits that experience turn into suggest and Broken’: Tom Murphy and the ‘Famine’ of contemporary eire (pages 466–475): Shaun Richards
Chapter 39 Caryl Churchill: Feeling international (pages 476–487): Elin Diamond
Chapter forty Howard Barker and the Theatre of disaster (pages 488–498): Chris Megson
Chapter forty-one interpreting background within the performs of Brian Friel (pages 499–508): Lionel Pilkington
Chapter forty two Marina Carr: Violence and Destruction: Language, area and panorama (pages 509–518): Cathy Leeney
Chapter forty three Scrubbing up great? Tony Harrison's Stagings of the prior (pages 519–529): Richard Rowland
Chapter forty four The query of Multiculturalism: the performs of Roy Williams (pages 530–540): D. Keith Peacock
Chapter forty five Ed Thomas: Jazz photos within the Gaps of Language (pages 541–550): David Ian Rabey
Chapter forty six Theatre and expertise (pages 551–562): Andy Lavender

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Extra info for A Companion to Modern British and Irish Drama 1880-2005

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All those stocks in the old free enquiry’ (Osborne 1966: 38). For all his faults, Porter sees the English past as something to learn from. For his wife’s friends, it is something to learn about, something now museumized but scarcely the basis for a national future. Porter’s analysis of upper-class paternalism and pusillanimity is sound enough. The problem is that he has not worked the dialectic through, and so his revolt is in the end less against the imperialism of the aristocracy than against the timidity with which its members gave the empire up.

This suppresses the actual cultural significance of Famine, which dramatizes individuals and collectivities as socially produced relations in dynamic dialogue with each other. Even if Famine is fruitfully regarded as a tragedy – and its material is such as to risk exhausting the concept – it would be wise to approach it with Wole Soyinka’s observation in mind: The persistent search for the meaning of tragedy, for a re-definition in terms of culture or private experience is, at the least, man’s recognition of certain areas of depthexperience which are not satisfactorily explained by general aesthetic theories .

Such a shaping of the modern democratic polis has been rehearsed in the dramas of England over the past half-century. If the logic of Yeats’s re-reading of Shakespeare were to be carried forward and applied to some of the keynote players of modern Britain, then it might be possible to read John Osborne’s Look Back in Anger, no less than The Hostage by Brendan Behan, as a postcolonial text. One could, for example, analyse that year-of-Suez drama of 1956 in the light of some of the themes adumbrated in this chapter.

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